Arts 12

1. The representation of new media art in a Museum should be bold, innovative, and individualized to create an emotional impact that will revolutionize the viewers’ perception about the history of art.

2. The Museum of New Media Art reflects the global scope of new media art in virtual and three dimensional spaces by creating an interactive and immersive global environment that explores new media art in its primitive form of bits and data, its course of development, and its impact in society.

3. The Museum of New Media Art preserves the works of new media artists, establishes new media in the history of art, and arouses intellectual curiosity in the viewers and other artists.

4. A museum of new media art virtually explores the content, context, and reality of new media art.

5. A museum of new media art immerses the viewer into a digital virtual reality to encompass the beauty, creativity, and bibliography of artists and works.

6. A museum of new media art needs to establish a direct connection between new media and former art forms to contemporize and help viewers engage and explore the dynamics and beauty of this new art form.

7. The representation of new media art in a museum should address the use of technology in new media art. The use of technology in new media art has rendered impossible artworks to interactive and immersive environments that conceptualize emotions, feelings, and reality.

8. A museum of new media art introduces new media and the use of technology as a new form of art and design. The rendering of new media art and design by the Museum of New Media Art increases the knowledge, understanding, and utility of new media art.

9. A museum of new media art is an educational database that contributes to the dissemination of new media art and the unique techniques and styles of individual artists in this field.

10. A virtual three dimensional museum of new media art needs to imitate a real museum through virtual tours, recordings, and pop up descriptions of the artworks being seen. This virtual museum is an artwork in itself and focuses on new media art’s accessibility, creativity, and manageability.

May 21
Theses for New Media Art Museums
Ball and Chain created by James Clar on 2010 is currently being exhibited at the VOLTA in New York. This sculpture integrates both technology and culture to represent society’s dependency on energy and technology. This sculpture contains 24 car LED headlights, bounded to a power outlet by a thick heavy chain. This artwork is a metaphor of individual’s need for energy and electricity in today’s technological era. The sculptures emphasis moves away from the human body and uses objects found around our society to conceptualize individualism and societal changes.  the  For more information on the artist click here.
May 7

Ball and Chain created by James Clar on 2010 is currently being exhibited at the VOLTA in New York. This sculpture integrates both technology and culture to represent society’s dependency on energy and technology. This sculpture contains 24 car LED headlights, bounded to a power outlet by a thick heavy chain. This artwork is a metaphor of individual’s need for energy and electricity in today’s technological era. The sculptures emphasis moves away from the human body and uses objects found around our society to conceptualize individualism and societal changes.  the  For more information on the artist click here.

In the City by Laure-Anne Jacobs was created in 2007.  Life Cycle is the 4th edition of the virtual exhibition series of an online art project known as Anina.be. This artwork can be found on Anina.be. Furthermore this artwork displays people going through their ordinary lives in a series of cycles displayed by photographs and images that are digitally mastered and altered with glowing edges and sounds. This artwork emphasizes the evolution of media technology and its depiction of the real world. The alteration and digital imaging of these photographs deemphasizes the classical beauty and elegance of photographs and focuses on the individuals’ emotions by distorting the rendering of their facial features.
For more information on the artist please click here.
May 7

In the City by Laure-Anne Jacobs was created in 2007.  Life Cycle is the 4th edition of the virtual exhibition series of an online art project known as Anina.be. This artwork can be found on Anina.be. Furthermore this artwork displays people going through their ordinary lives in a series of cycles displayed by photographs and images that are digitally mastered and altered with glowing edges and sounds. This artwork emphasizes the evolution of media technology and its depiction of the real world. The alteration and digital imaging of these photographs deemphasizes the classical beauty and elegance of photographs and focuses on the individuals’ emotions by distorting the rendering of their facial features.

For more information on the artist please click here.

May 7

Lightscape 3D was created by Elliot Woods in 2010. Lightscape is a rendering of projected images onto vertical strips of wires into a volumetric real space that allows digital graphics to be both immersive and tangible. Woods artwork is based of Albert Hwang’s Wiremap, an innovative projection technique that builds a real and interactive 3d image by manipulating light from a projector (Wiremap).  The collaboration of both artists make an individualistic installation; each artist has a different way of rendering light and music into a live performance of different light and geometric shapes arrays. For example the high paced electronic music differs from the slow paced melody of Lumacra another collaborative installation produced by Albert Hwang and Matt Parker. Lightscape 3D can be found on kimchiandchips.com/litescape.php. To see other works by Elliot Woods click here.

May 7

Lumarca 15 was created by Albert Hwang and Matt Parker on September 2011. This installation is an on-going collaborative work that focuses on data visualization and digital cinema. It allows viewers to see projected three dimensional images and motion on vertical pieces of string that are equally spaced apart and taped to the ground. This allows artist to convey a narrative or aesthetic information in a theatrical three dimensional space. The use of Elle Intrigue by Sydney Poma gives this artwork a mystifying feel as the motion and lights transform to the beat of the piano. The similarities between Lightscape 3D and Lumacra 15 are highly noticeable however the collaboration of different artists make each artwork individualistic due to the fact that each artist is an individual with a different interpretation of light, shapes, and music. This artwork can be found in New York at the Eyebeam: Art and Technology Center. For news updates and information about the artists click here.

                Jaron Lanier, Michel Foucault, and Jacques Rancier, discuss the oppositions that have arisen due to the conventional ideology of art museums and theatre, and the change in technology. Many Authors have defined the extent to which technology influences our actions and processing ability as a new fad. However, Lanier, Foucault, and Rancier, discuss the change as an alteration to society’s political, economic, and social roots.

                The ideologies of today’s modern cybernetic world oppose the 20th century conventional forms of artistic and viewer merit. Lancier states in his article that “cybernetic totalism will ultimately be bad for spirituality, morality, and business”(Lancier, 2). Lancier’s concept reveries his idea of the digital world being flat due to the degradation of human beings capabilities and qualities by this world in which they have been immersed. Lancier describes the digital culture as flat because “the whole point of connected media technologies was that we were supposed to come up with new, amazing cultural expression” not “mine the past like salvagers picking over a garbage dump” (Lancier, 9). Lancier’s ideology of the digital culture differs to the media that is posted on Youtube and blogs, his concepts of new media offer “reality” and creative forms of expressionism that steer away from the conventional use of television, commercial content, and video. Lancier’s inference of historical economic and political change on music and capitalism shows the 20th century conventional ideology, “changing circumstances always used to inspire amazing new art” (Lancier,6). The alteration between authorship and open source sharing in the digital world created a new opportunity that led to a variety of “flat information networks that suppress local contexts in favor of global ones” (Lancier, 10). Therefore, the idea of flatness in the digital world is due to the open source sharing and free content available on the internet which lacks the local context and suppresses meaning and expression from the artworks.  Lancier states in his article “there’s no significant technological barrier to getting musicians involved in the contextual side of expression only an ideological one” (Lancier 12).   Lancier’s observation induces the individual to ponder on the creation of an ideological barrier in the cybernetic world.

 The ideology of a barrier or confinement can be taken from the conventional ideologies of the 20th century as a form of discipline and punishment. With the development of the internet and Creative Commons, the idea behind a political ideology still exists despite the changes in authorship and copyrights. The concept behind a political ideology can be defined as Panopticism. Foucalt defines Panopticism as “an important mechanism that automatizes and disindividualizes power” and “whatever use one may wish to put it to, produces homogeneous effects of power” (Foucault, 5). In this statement, Foucault is describing the use of political power as a mean to homogenize and orderly organize a society. Most organizations in modern day society are built upon this idea, including the modern day cyber world, computer, and internet. “Panopticon must not be understood as a dream building: diagram of a mechanism I power reduced to its ideal form; its functioning must be represented as a pure architectural and optical system: it is in fact a figure of political technology” (Foucault, 7) The panoptic schema starts as a political ideology induced from the plague but the shift from an ideology to a mechanism is known as panaptocism. This idea gives individuals “power of mind over mind” and ensures its economy as well as confines individuals into a group with its aim to “strengthen the social forces-to increase production, to develop the economy, spread education, raise the level of public morality; to increase and multiply” (Foucault, 9. The ideologies that were embedded into society during the early 20th century oppose 21st century ideologies, in regards to cultural and artistic expressionism because they erode our imagination and individualistic pursuits.

Theatre has been around for quite some years. In Ranciere’s article, the theatre was once regarded as a place where passive spectatorship turned the living body of a community enacting its own principle (Ranciere 272). This idea of theatre rejects the personal experience a spectator can have and shifts it to become a collective process. Ranciere discusses the emancipation of the spectator as the liberation from this collective idea to encompass the differences that exist amongst individuals’ thoughts, emotions, and experiences. Ranciere’s recognition of this as “a principle of equality, which begins when we dismiss the opposition between looking and acting and understanding that the distribution of the visible itself is part of the configuration of domination and subjection and that interpretation of the world is already a means of transforming it” helps the individual realize that the emancipation of the spectator is the first step to deviate away from the 20th century ideologies (Ranciere, 277). The concepts Ranciere encompasses highlight the oppositions that exist in Lanier and Foucault’s works due to the cybernetic realm and political ideologies.  Ranciere, denotes the equality that exists between the spectator, community, and context, and denotes the opposition that exists between the individual and collective experience in regards to theatre. Nevertheless this notion can be applied to all artworks and means of presentation, therefore if the emancipation of the cyber art spectator is achieved, panopticism and the flatness in cultural  expression can be reversed to reflect individualistic and creative pursuits.

Apr 30
Emancipation
1.San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
2. New Media art and the gallery in the digital age 
3. The Age of Instabilityby Argen Mulder
Apr 23

1.San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

2. New Media art and the gallery in the digital age 

3. The Age of Instabilityby Argen Mulder

             New Media is a broad term in media studies that has connections to digital media, video games, and user interface. The characteristics of each area include manipulating, transforming, digitalizing analog data, compressing information, and interaction between the user and the operation device for accessibility and demand. New media technologies include hypertext, computer programming, graphical human computer interface, social networking, and multimedia computer graphics. These technologies share the characteristics mentioned above. Furthermore they manipulate, compress, and transform digital media into artworks. The New Media Reader explores new media artists such as Seymour Papert, pioneer of artificial intelligence and inventor of Logo programming language. The reason why this book includes previous artists of new media technologies is to help readers understand the course’s historical background and influential people in the development of new media.

                New media began as a field in the late 1980’s and since then it has been an emerging field of constant debate because it has no set boundaries or regulations similar to the authorship and copyrights that exist within the physical art world. As stated by Lev Manovich, “new media technologies have actualized the ideas of projects by artists, but they have extended them much further than the artists originally imagined” (New Media from Borges to HTML with links). For example, going back to Papert and the New Media Reader, one can discern that Seymour Papert was a precursor to new media technology today. However, without further research done through the internet it would have been impossible to discover that he inspired Microsoft Word, MSW Logo, and FMS Logo (Wikipedia). These discoveries can only be made by having accessibility to the information presented in text. The use of hypertext in Lev Manovich’s article, New Media from Borges to HTML with links, allows for the accessibility of hyperlinked information on the key names of artists, founders, and institutions of new media art. Professor John Crooks “extended” the amount of information offered in Manovich’s original essay by simply hyperlinking keywords such as 010101: Art in Technological Times to the actual webpage of the online exhibition of digital media graphics. John Crooks emphasizes how hypertext can expand the authorship of Manovich’s paper without infringement of copyrights and expand the knowledge readers obtain from it.

               If the reader pays close attention he or she will see that the use of hypertext in a conventional article is an example of Manovich’s fourth proposition. The mix of hypertext and the article’s content can be defined as new media because it surpasses the physical aesthetics of reading a book and it immerses the reader into a digital world full of information and knowledge. The imaginative world of reading gets transformed into a world full of pictures, summaries, videos, and much more. The gallery provides all these different modes of presentation however; in this world where everything is changing I don’t believe that galleries will be needed to present digital media even as historical artifacts in the near future. The internet will take the place of galleries in the digital presentation due to its accessibility and manageability of artworks and artifacts in the digital media world.

Apr 16
Learning from Hypertexting
Writing and Placeholders are captured in this image.
Title A History of Art
 Author William Henry Goodyear
PublisherA. S. Barnes, 1888
Original fromthe University of Michigan
DigitizedNov 21, 2008
http://goo.gl/11HB7
Apr 9

Writing and Placeholders are captured in this image.

Title A History of Art

 Author William Henry Goodyear

PublisherA. S. Barnes, 1888

Original fromthe University of Michigan

DigitizedNov 21, 2008

http://goo.gl/11HB7

(Source: )

Apr 9

Transit by Scott Snibbe, June 28, 2010

(Source: youtube.com)